Breastfeeding Facts and FAQs

CREATING CONFIDENT MOMS WITH HEALTHY BABIES AND HAPPY FAMILIES 

LIQUID GOLD STATS

“Breastfeeding provides unmatched health benefits for babies and mothers. It is the clinical gold standard for infant feeding and nutrition, with breast milk uniquely tailored to meet the health needs of a growing baby. We must do more to create supportive and safe environments for mothers who choose to breastfeed.”

— Dr. Ruth Petersen, Director of CDC’s Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity

How do I know if I need to meet with a Lactation Consultant?


It is recommended that you prepare for breastfeeding by taking a prenatal breastfeeding class. This can really increase your knowledge which can help prevent complications caused by lack of information or misinformation. If your baby has lost more than 7% of their weight at hospital discharge, and you are unsure he/she is getting enough milk, then you should see a Lactation Consultant to prevent receiving well intentioned advice from others, that may sabotage your milk supply and breastfeeding journey. If breastfeeding is causing you pain, you should see a Lactation Consultant. If your baby does not have 3-4 stools AND 3-4 wet diapers within a 24 hour period by four days of age, you should meet with a Lactation Consultant. This experience is usually accompanied by a baby who sleeps through feeding times, cries whenever he/she is awake, and painful breastfeeding. If your baby appears lethargic, has a dry mouth or lips, take your baby to the Emergency Department. These are just a few reasons to see a Lactation Consultant but there are many more (pre-term babies, twins/multiples etc.).




Are lactation visits worth the money?


In short, YES! Think about how much it costs to get a haircut and color ($90-$200), lashes ($150+), mani/pedi ($50-75), retail coffee drinks ($50+ mthly), teeth whitening, facials, waxing, acne/skincare, or make-up. I know some of you would never think of indulging in any of these things, but I am a Diva, and I spend money on several of the listed items. How about gym memberships, organic, non-gmo food, essential oils or non-toxic household cleaning items? Breastmilk is the first & ESSENTIAL organic, non-GMO, whole food your baby needs. How do you feel when you pay $75-$150 to see your doctor who spends five minutes with you? Lactation Consultants spend time driving to their clients home and back. They fight through traffic and weather to serve their moms & babies. When they arrive, they spend anywhere from 1-2 hours with their clients, asking questions, listening to their concerns, and assessing mom and baby. Then they drive back to their office or home and spend 30-60 minutes writing up a customized care plan for their client (like a roadmap to help guide you on your specific journey). Many Lactation Consultants include free phone/email support after your visit. Now, how many of your doctors include all of those services in the cost of their office visit? Learn more about Lactation Consultant educational requirements. ( https://iblce.org/step-1-prepare-for-ibclc-certification/lactation-specific-clinical-experience/pathway-1/) Lactation consultants can provide many cost-saving benefits to your family. Depending on what part of the country you are in, an initial Lactation visit can cost between $100-300. Many moms need 1-3 visits with a Lactation Consultant. Feeding a baby formula costs between $1,138-$1188 for 1 year ( https://bfcaa.com/resources/cost-of-formula-feeding/). This is just the cost of the formula. Now add the cost from missing work for more sick visits to the doctor and the cost of actually seeing the doctor and the meds they give your baby. When I was a new mom I truly did not believe breastfed babies were significantly healthier than breastfed babies, but the research doesn’t lie*. Most importantly, a good Lactation Consultant can aid in the irreplaceable gift of giving you and your baby moments of nurturing, warmth, bonding, health and nutrition that is priceless. There are many, many more reasons a Lactation Consultant is worth their weight in gold (including decreased risk of autoimmune disease, higher IQ and lower cholesterol in adulthood), but I will leave that to these other amazing authors to explain. Best for Babes Article & Breastfeeding Center of Ann Arbor ( http://www.bestforbabes.org/are-lactation-consultants-too-pricey/?epik=dj0yJnU9YWJfRnZfQi04MFpYUy1qdlFVMEJ3UnV0MUhiWkg0bEEmbj13cHpTTC02dE5YYVJuT3g3bkpod3V3Jm09MyZ0PUFBQUFBRnpSMXRv) *Duijts L, Jaddoe VW, Hofman A, Moll HA. Prolonged and exclusive breastfeeding reduces the risk of infectious diseases in infancy. Pediatrics. 2010;126(1). ( www.pediatrics.org/cgi/content/full/126/1/e18pmid:20566605) Cohen, R., Mrtek, M. B., & Mrtek, R. G. (1995). Comparison of maternal absenteeism and infant illness rates among breastfeeding and formula-feeding women in two corporations. American Journal of Health Promotion, 10(2), 148–153. ( http://www.pediatrics.org/cgi/content/full/126/1/e18pmid:20566605)




How comfortable are you with evaluating and helping babies with tongue-tie?


Great question! Naiomi has completed the 3-day, hands-on, course titled, 'Oral Habilitation of the Breastfeeding Dyad, a Master Class for the IBCLC'. As of Spring 2020, Naiomi is the ONLY lactation consultant in the Austin area, who has completed this extensive training. In addition, Naiomi has taken several online tongue-tie educational courses. Naiomi takes a holistic approach to managing tongue-ties and believes dyads (mom & baby), should learn to breastfeed competently instead of just learning tips to help compensate breastfeeding through structural dysfunction. This approach allows for long-term infant growth, development and breastfeeding success. Milk Diva has a network of allied health providers that specialize in supporting breastfeeding dyads. So the short answer is YES! Naiomi is VERY comfortable managing babies with possible tongue-tie!




Is breastfeeding supposed to hurt….not even a little?


Breastfeeding should be a pleasant experience for you and your baby. If you experience nipple pain during the first 3-5 days that is more than slight tenderness, it may be a sign that something is not quite right with the babies’ latch, position or suck. Correcting poor position or latch can really help alleviate sore, cracked nipples. Equally as important, correcting these things can help protect your milk supply and help your baby get more milk*. For more info see Persistent Pain ( https://www.milkdiva.com/post/persistent-pain-and-breastfeeding)




Are there any tips to prevent breastfeeding complications?


https://youtu.be/b4iF3JO8OxQ




What should I expect the first 24-48 hours after birth?


https://youtu.be/5tLVI00cbcY




When should I introduce a bottle?


After successful breastfeeding has been established. Usually after 4 weeks of age. I recommend using a teat with the slowest flow available, and with a wide base so baby can use a wide mouth latch on the bottle just like the breast. I like the First Years Breast flow bottle or Avent.




What are the benefits of breastfeeding?


https://youtu.be/DpVp07lgDsI




How do I know if my baby is getting enough milk?


  • Baby is nursing frequently, 8-12 times within 24 hours.
  • Baby seems content and happy after a feed. An example is relaxed open hands as opposed to tight, balled-up fists.
  • Weight gain is as expected 155-240 grams or 5.5-8.5 ounces per week until the age of four months.
  • You can hear periods of swallowing/gulping while infant is nursing.
  • Baby has 3-4 stools every day after day 4 of age.
  • After the first six weeks, many breastfeeding infants slow down and make less stool and this is completely normal.
  • Baby may not pass much urine at first but this increases each day. By day two look for two wet diapers within a 24 hour period, day three or four look for three or more wet diapers within a 24 hour period. After five days, wet diapers should be more frequent, usually 6 or more over 24 hours.
https://youtu.be/eAWpWFREo9o




How Dad can help?


https://youtu.be/CbObl6gLMQ0




Uncovering breastfeeding misconceptions


https://youtu.be/-NKgyFI_phs




What does a proper latch look like?


https://youtu.be/OJuCBK2cDi8




What are some of the most common breastfeeding positions?


Latching on in three different positions* Cradlehold: Baby’s head rests on Mom’s forearm. She supports the breast with an open hand. Place the thumb on the upper side of the breast and the rest of the fingers on the lower side of the breast. Be sure to place fingers behind the areola. The nipple should point towards the baby’s nose. When the baby opens his mouth widely, mom drags the baby towards her. You can see that the baby has a good latch when the chin is close to the breast and the nose is free. The baby has a widely open mouth and lots of breast tissue in his mouth. The sucking movements can be seen all the way to the baby’s ears. Once the baby has a good latch and mom doesn’t need to support the breast any longer, she can adjust the baby’s position by dragging the baby’s lower body towards herself. Then the baby gets her nose free from the breast tissue and the chin in good contact with the breast. Cross-cradlehold: Mom supports baby’s shoulders and back with her hand and forearm. She supports the breast with an open hand. Place the thumb on the upper side of the breast and the rest of the fingers on the lower side of the breast. Be sure to place fingers behind the areola The nipple should point towards the baby’s nose. When the baby opens his mouth widely, mom drags the baby towards her. You can see that the baby has a good latch when the chin is close to the breast and the nose is free. The baby has a widely open mouth and lots of breast tissue in his mouth. The sucking movements can be seen all the way to the baby’s ears. Once the baby has a good latch and mom doesn’t need to support the breast any longer, she can adjust the baby’s position by dragging the baby’s lower body towards herself. Then the baby gets her nose free from the breast tissue and the chin in good contact with the breast. Footballhold: Mom supports her breast with an open hand. Place the thumb on the upper side of the breast and the rest of the fingers on the lower side of the breast. Be sure to place fingers behind the areola The nipple should point towards the baby’s nose. When the baby opens his mouth widely, mom drags the baby towards her. https://youtu.be/LvbUslem0aY *Copyright © 2010 Ammehjelpen





*Sources

((1), (2) ,(7), (8) https://www.womenshealth.gov

(3) Duijts L, Jaddoe VW, Hofman A, Moll HA. Prolonged and exclusive breastfeeding reduces the risk of infectious diseases in infancy. Pediatrics. 2010;126(1). Available at: www.pediatrics.org/cgi/content/full/126/1/e18pmid:20566605

(5) Cohen, R., Mrtek, M. B., & Mrtek, R. G. (1995). Comparison of maternal absenteeism and infant illness rates among breastfeeding and formula-feeding women in two corporations. American Journal of Health Promotion, 10(2), 148–153.

(4), (6)www.cdc.gov/breastfeeding

(9) These recommendations are supported by organizations including the American Academy of Pediatrics, American Academy of Family Physicians, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, American College of Nurse- Midwives, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, and American Public Health Association. 

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